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Tag Archives: Office 365

The Cloud Insider Times – Hosted Email Edition

We read article after article, use rights after use rights, to provide you the best and accurate information.  The Cloud Insider News takes articles written by you and others to tell your story and help educate the community.  In this edition, we take a look at Hosted Email.  Have a hot topic? Email info@splalicensing.com

Intermedia.Net New Intermedia Email Protection platform delivers multi-layer security

Vaultastic– I am already using Office 365 on the cloud, do I still need a separate email archiving solution?

Wired – Google Just Made Email a Heckuva Lot Easier to Deal With

CRN.Com – RapidScale Acquires Vonage’s Hosted Infra Business For Expanded Desktop-As-A-Service Portfolio

1 &1  – Phishing & Spam – how to identify fake customer communication via e-mail

military-technologies.net – ISPs or MSPs providing email services based on MailEnable, Zimbra and cPanel can now also sell Email Archiving services based on Vaultastic

MSPMentor.Net/SherwebWhy Time is Running Out on Hosted Exchange

Zimbra.Org-  Pluggins that extend the collaboration suite

Microsoft – How the City of Golden simplifies email management with the cloud

gcn.com – Is on-premises being killed by the cloud? Not necessarily.

Forbes The 10 Email Commandments You’re Breaking Every Day

Abovethelaw.com Do This Before You Send An Angry, Emotional Email That You’ll Regret

Thanks for reading,

SPLA Man

 
 

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Transition SKU’s for CRM Hoster’s Available Thru October, 2019

For Dynamics hosters worried about all the changes with CRM have until October 31, 2019 to license the transition SKU’s in SPLA.

Although good news and provides some flexibility, the transition pricing is still higher than current CRM licenses.  As an example, Basic CRM SKU transition pricing for Customer Service is almost double!

Transition pricing is available to ease transition to the new Dynamics 365 pricing model.  It is also designed for current CRM customers, not new customers.  To learn more about Dynamics 365, please check out Dynamics 365 Licensing for SPLA

Thanks for reading,

SPLA Man

PS- Dont forget to license SQL and Windows with CRM!

 

 
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Posted by on May 15, 2017 in CRM, Dynamics 365

 

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The Cloud Insider News – Dynamics CRM

We read article after article, use rights after use rights, to provide you the best and accurate information.  Now it’s your turn.  The Cloud Insider News takes articles written by you to tell your story and help educate the community.  In this edition, we take a look at CRM.  Have a hot topic? Email info@splalicensing.com

The Register Microsoft plans summer CRM war opener against Salesforce

XRMCRM Online FAQ

Omnivue.net (white paper) – Is Your Business Ready for ERP?

SaaSPlaza – What’s all the hype about Microsoft Dynamics 365?

Wealthmanagement.com/Tamarac – Five Ways a Client Portal Can Transform Your Practice

WatServ – Dynamics 365 Pricing Plans and Migration Discount Announced at Dynamics 365 Tech Conference.

Channele2eMicrosoft Preps Partners for Dynamics 365, LinkedIN Integration

Cisco – Cisco Unified CallConnector for Microsoft Dynamics CRM

Caltech Dynamics 365 Enterprise Edition Customer Service

Tribridge Is it Time to Check the Vital Signs of Your Microsoft Dynamics CRM System?

Computer WorldAdobe continues to march to the cloud

IpipelineCustomer Centricity – Do you “CRM?”

Thanks for reading,

SPLA Man

 
 

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Dynamics 365 Licensing for SPLA

Over the past several weeks, I’ve received several inquiries around Dynamics 365 what it means for CRM SPLA partners.  In this article, we will review the changes and when the changes will take effect.

Dynamics 365 for SPLA

In today’s SPLA licensing model, there are three products available –  CRM Essential, CRM Basic, and CRM Professional.  All come with different functionality and all come with different price points.  Those products will remain up until your agreement expires.  As with other products, once your agreement expires, you should report or license the new products.  In some cases, you are allowed to downgrade and run previous versions, but you must report the latest and greatest.  As an example, SQL 2016 is the latest edition of SQL, but that doesn’t mean you have to deploy SQL 2016; you can run 2012 or 2014 or God forbid 2008.  However, once you sign a new SPLA, you must follow the terms in the SPUR at the time of signing.  In this example, even though you deployed 2008, doesn’t mean you can license SQL 2008 by processor, you must still report it by core.  Dynamics CRM works the same way.   With Dynamics, the new products are Dynamics 365 Sales, Customer Service, and Team Members.  All come with bells and whistles and all come with higher pricing.  If you have an active SPLA prior to the announcement (November, 2016) you can continue to report the old products up until your agreement expires.  Once you sign a new agreement, you must report the higher priced products.

What are the options?

I’ve worked with a couple of Dynamics CRM hosters who had their agreement expire two months after Microsoft made this announcement.  In other words, Microsoft announced these changes in September (give or take – most widely known to resellers and partners in November) but their agreement expired in October.  The poor CRM providers are really in a pickle.  Microsoft dropped the bomb on them and two months later their pricing almost doubled!  What are they supposed to do?  Blame their reseller? Sure.  Everyone does.  Blame Microsoft?  Yes.  But that only gets you so far.  Cry?  Always.

Microsoft made some adjustments and offered “transition pricing”.  Transition pricing allows SPLA partners who have an active SPLA prior to November, 2016, the ability to report lower transition pricing up until their agreement expires.  The transition pricing is lower than new pricing but still doesn’t offer much of a discount.  When your agreement does expire, Microsoft will force you to license the under the new licensing and pricing model.

My Opinion

In my opinion, CRM provider are the old Exchange provider.   When Office 365/BPOS came about, small Exchange providers found it very difficult to compete.  It wasn’t just from a licensing perspective but also managing and deploying Exchange became too costly.  What happened?  Smaller Exchange providers are now CSP or out of business.  Dynamics CRM is now the old Exchange.  Microsoft is not going to lower SPLA pricing for Dynamics CRM.  It is not in their best interest to do so.  Harsh reality?  Yes.

Allow me to put on my Microsoft hat. What do you do?  There’s a couple of ways to think about it.  On one hand, Dynamics 365 isn’t all that bad.  I do think Microsoft rushed to market with the product.  I also think there are ways to up sell customers into the latest product.  There are opportunities to offer Dynamics CRM and deploy CRM and manage CRM.  For many organizations, CRM is the lifeblood of their sales.  CRM goes down, it’s bad for their business.  In speaking to a colleague, the LinkedIN acquisition makes Dynamics 365 an interesting proposition.  If you are able to seamlessly host Dynamics 365 on your platform and integrate their LinkedIN contacts as well, there could be a compelling reason to transition to the latest and greatest.

Ok, now my Microsoft hat is off.  I think Microsoft should be more patient and lengthen the transition pricing to make it more compelling for CRM hosters and to their customers.  I think service providers are the bread and butter to Microsoft hosted offerings.  SPLA is the one program that differentiates Microsoft v. Amazon v. Google.  Thirty thousand service providers worldwide who are willing to host Microsoft technology.  You don’t want to abruptly interrupt their business.  After all, no matter if they get Dynamics from a Microsoft datacenter or from a partner, Microsoft wins.  Amazon can’t say the same thing.

Would love to hear comments.  You can email me at info@splalicensing.com or leave a comment below.

Thanks for reading,

SPLA Man

 

 

 
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Posted by on May 9, 2017 in Dynamics 365

 

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Microsoft Online Services Terms – What you need to pay attention to before signing your Azure agreement

There’s a lot of benefits to moving to Azure, I’ll let your Microsoft account team review them with you.  On this website, we are not that concerned about the benefits, all we care about is the licensing.  In this article, we will review the Microsoft Online Services Terms.

What is the Microsoft Online Services Terms?  First starters, it used to be called Microsoft Online Services Use Rights or MOLSUR for short (or long).   It is now called OST pronounced OAST when speaking to Microsoft.  Basically the OST defines how you may consume online services through Microsoft.  You can download a copy here.  Although your legal team should review the document in its entirety, below are some of the highlights I think you will find relevant and are often overlooked.

License Reassignment 

“Most, but not all, SLs may be reassigned. Except as permitted in this paragraph or in the Online Service-specific Terms, Customer may not reassign an SL on a short-term basis (i.e., within 90 days of the last assignment). Customer may reassign an SL on a short-term basis to cover a user’s absence or the unavailability of a device that is out of service. Reassignment of an SL for any other purpose must be permanent. When Customer reassigns an SL from one device or user to another, Customer must block access and remove any related software from the former device or from the former user’s device.” (April, 2017 OST)

What does this mean?

Most Microsoft products cannot be reassigned on a short-term basis, that’s why Microsoft has the use right called license mobility.  In short, pay attention to which users are assigned a license and if/when they no longer need the service.

Hosting Exception “Customer may create and maintain a Customer Solution and, despite anything to the contrary in Customer’s volume licensing agreement, combine Microsoft Azure Services with Customer Data owned or licensed by Customer or a third party, to create a Customer Solution using the Microsoft Azure Service and the Customer Data together. Customer may permit third parties to access and use the Microsoft Azure Services in connection with the use of that Customer Solution. Customer is responsible for that use and for ensuring that these terms and the terms and conditions of Customer’s volume licensing agreement are met by that use.” (April, 2017)

What does this mean?

It allows you (a service provider) the right to use Azure as a datacenter provider.  The last sentence is very important in the above definition “Customer is responsible for that use and for ensuring that these terms and the terms and conditions of Customer’s volume licensing agreement are met by that use.”  In the above definition,  “customer” is you.  If you use Azure as a datacenter provider, purchase Azure via your own volume licensing agreement, and use SPLA for user based products (e.g. RDS) you must follow the OST, Product Terms, and the SPUR!

Azure Services Limitations

Customer may not “Allow multiple users to directly or indirectly access any Microsoft Azure Service feature that is made available on a per user basis (e.g., Active Directory Premium). Specific reassignment terms applicable to a Microsoft Azure Service feature may be provided in supplemental documentation for that feature.” (April, 2017 OST)

What does this mean?

Sounds similar to a SAL license right? “Directly or Indirectly access any Microsoft Azure Service.”  Although if you are using Azure as your datacenter provider, the likelihood of you consuming user based licensing through Azure is not very high.

Security

I encourage you to read the security measures and policy’s set forth by Microsoft for their online services.  You can read it here.  I included a breakdown of the difference compliance and security certifications below:

Microsoft Online Information Security Policy (as of April, 2017)

Online Service ISO 27001 ISO 27002

Code of Practice

ISO 27018

Code of Practice

SSAE 16 SOC 1 Type II SSAE 16 SOC 2 Type II
Office 365 Services Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Microsoft Dynamics 365 Core Services Yes Yes Yes Yes* Yes*
Microsoft Azure Core Services Yes Yes Yes Varies** Varies**
Microsoft Cloud App Security Yes Yes Yes No No
Microsoft Intune Online Services Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Microsoft Power BI Services Yes Yes Yes No No

 

Last and certainly not least, I get asked A LOT about language that you should include as a service provider.  I would encourage you to create your own online services terms for your hosted offerings.  Too many providers do not have basic language around compliance, licensing, and overall use rights.  At a minimum, you should include a copy of the End User License Terms for SPLA.  If you do not have a copy, please contact your reseller.  If you forget to include licensing terms and conditions, you could be on the hook during an audit.  Don’t be on the hook.

Thanks for reading,

SPLA Man

 
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Posted by on April 24, 2017 in Uncategorized

 

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The Cloud Insider Times

In this edition of The Cloud Insider Times, you will find articles on the likes of Google, Amazon, IBM, Veeam, and the infamous Shared Computer Activation (among others) If your company would like to be included in future articles, please email info@splalicensing.com
Computer Business Review – Three Private Cloud Myths Busted!
 
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Posted by on April 20, 2017 in The Cloud Insider Times

 

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Exchange 2007 support ended. What does that mean for you?

This past weekend I was forced to buy new running shoes.  I run 3-4 times a week, and my philosophy had always been if not’s broke, don’t fix it.  Recently, my shoes started to feel heavy, my feet started to hurt, and I knew it was my body telling me to change (something).  After googling (sorry binging) different causes for running pain, one of the top results came up “change your running shoes.”  I then proceeded to look at my shoes more closely and noticed the bottoms were worn, the shoe itself was very flexible ( bends easily – a bad thing) and realized my shoes were no longer the shoes I once I loved.  It was time to upgrade.   In a strange way, my buying decision is similar to most IT departments.  If it’s not broke, don’t fix it until we absolutely have to.  For consumers running older versions of Exchange, that time is now.  This past week, Exchange 2007 support has gulp…ended.

One (of the many) reasons customers move to the cloud is outdated technology.   When something as critical as security updates, product updates, etc. are no longer available, customers start looking for other solutions.  In the case of Exchange, customers either upgrade on premise (which also means upgrading their hardware)  or finally start thinking about the cloud.  Now that can mean good news for you (if you are an Exchange hoster) or bad news if you haven’t started the conversations with your potential clients.  It’s also great news for Office 365.

I would  guess that Microsoft is looking at all end customers who purchased Exchange 2007 but haven’t upgraded to Exchange 2010.  Those customers  are all  prime for Office 365 conversations.   Every Office 365 distributor and reseller are also reaching out to these customers.  Check out Sherweb, Intermedia (one of Microsoft’s largest Exchange hosters), and Rackspace Every single one of them are not saying “go to our cloud” when exploring migration options, the top reason is “Migrate to Office 365”

If your company has not investigated getting into the CSP game or partnering, the time is now.  I’m not selling you on Office 365, I am selling you to watch out for the competition.  As mentioned above – SherWeb, Intermedia, and Rackspace are all hosting Exchange but they are also promoting Office 365 through product support life cycles.   One way to stay ahead of the competition, is to know when product life cycles end and which products are impacted.   For a list of product support updates and life cycles check out https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/lifecycle/search

Thanks for reading,

SPLA Man

 

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on April 17, 2017 in In My Opinion, Uncategorized

 

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