Monthly Archives: January 2018

SQL Developer Edition: Be very…very…careful

Here’s a brief rundown with SQL Developer edition and what to be aware of if you decide to deploy it.

  • It’s free – you can download it for zero costs
  • It’s a compliance nightmare – When you deploy MAP tool in an audit, the scan typically will reveal a SQL Enterprise installation not SQL Developer edition.  Most features of Developer are found in Enterprise which brings on more confusion.  If you are audited, you must prove this license is for non-production environments.  Which brings us to the next bullet point.
  • What is a non production environment?  Any time you host Microsoft software it is defined as “production.”  Whether or not you charge for this access is irrelevant.  (Microsoft doesn’t care if you make money off of it).  If you do internal development, that’s non production.  If you host a dev environment for the benefit of your customer, now that is software as a service and would be considered production.
  •  Microsoft made SQL Development free in 2016.  For those that need prior versions, you would need to access them through Visual Studio subscriptions.   Again, for non-production environments.  Otherwise, you can report Visual Studio through SPLA; per user, per month.
  • To play it safe, isolate the hardware for any customer’s that want to transfer their free version of SQL Dev to your datacenter environment.

One might ask if it’s free, what’s the penalty if I am found out of compliant?  If you were deploying SQL Dev for production use and Microsoft finds out, you would have to true up using SQL Enterprise.  In other words, if you installed SQL Dev in 2014, get audited in 2017, Microsoft could force you to true up SQL Enterprise dating back to when you first installed Developer edition.  That’s not a very cheap solution!

Is this confusing?  Yes.  You have to make a decision of whether or not this is production or non-production environment.  Do not install SQL Developer because it’s free.  It may cost you in the long run.

Thank you for reading,



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What is SAM in 2018?

Software Asset Management (SAM) has been around since Microsoft first published their Product Use Rights.  With every product introduced came an enormous amount of licensing complexity.   Unless you hold a PHD in Microsoft licensing rules, most organizations would quickly find themselves in a licensing conundrum they never saw coming.  In walks in our friend SAM.  SAM will help you with your audit, SAM will make sure things are running smoothly, and SAM will be your new best friend.  But where does  SAM fit in if your customers move to the cloud?  Do they even need SAM anymore?  Poor SAM might be pushed aside like he is a box of Windows Vista.

Not so fast my friend.  SAM is needed more now than it was even two years ago.  Why?  Regardless of what any publisher may tell you, moving to the cloud doesn’t lower licensing complexities, if anything it enhances it.  Sure if you are a new organization  and do not own any licensing, moving to the cloud is easy, but if you are like 99.9% of all other organizations, you have licenses you may want to leverage instead of buying them all over again. How do you do that?  If you are a service provider, how do you ensure your customer’s are compliant?

Most of my conversations have moved away from “How to license Windows Server” to “How can my customers leverage SQL in my datacenter environment if I am also reporting SQL on my SPLA” or “I want to use AWS using my SPLA licenses, can I do that?”  And recently, “I signed a CSP Direct agreement to leverage QMTH, but now what?”

SAM is no longer about audits.  Sure, you might get audited, and we can certainly help, but more importantly,  what are you going to do about your licensing once your audit is completed?  How much time do you spend making sure your licenses or your customer licenses are compliant?  How do you know if you report 10k a month, that it’s right?  Most service providers are concerned about under reporting SPLA, I would argue the bigger concern is over reporting.  Here’s what a good SAM engagement should provide:

  1. Licensing Costs – how much are you paying for licenses as compared to other organizations?
  2. Use Rights – What use rights are available that you might know exist.  (there are plenty)
  3. How to ensure your customers are compliant and what language should you include to eliminate compliance risk in all your agreements.
  4. Help identify which licensing program is best for your organization and your customers.  Wouldn’t it be great if you worked with a company that can also reduce your clients licensing costs? This would include CSP, License Mobility, Outsourcing (AWS/Azure/Google, etc).
  5. Compliance:  How to ensure you are not only compliant, but licensing the most cost-effective way possible.
  6. Audit Support – Yes, if the audit police come knocking, you should be in good shape to handle based on your SAM partner expertise.
  7. Roadmap (I hate that term) but it’s important.  What is on the radar that you should be aware of?  As an example, CSP is an annual term, are there plans to make it 3 year like other licensing programs?  Pricing is locked, but can I negotiate at the end of my renewal for CSP?   What happens if I true down?  (Good luck with that by the way).

There are plenty other examples but I think you get the point, cloud licensing is about as complex as on premise licensing.  SAM in 2018 should help you tackle these areas and not just handle audit support.  Any company that promotes audit support is not a business partner, they are the One and Done’s of software licensing.

If you have a question please email

Thanks for reading,


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Posted by on January 17, 2018 in Uncategorized


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See ya 2017! Upcoming changes for and Microsoft SPLA

Happy New Year to all my followers, partners, and readers.  It has definitely been a year of transformation for Microsoft and the cloud community.  2017 has also been a big year for  Here are some of the highlights of 2017 and upcoming announcements for 2018!

  • had over 150k unique visitors in 2017.  To put this in perspective, I had 3k visitors in 2014.  Which I guess is good but bad that there’s some much confusion over licensing.
  • The number one topic with the most views?  “How to License Exchange”
  • Microsoft announced major price increases in 2018 (starting February for January usage)
  • Not all SPLA Resellers are created equal.  Make sure your pricing is accurate. You can email to review.
  • I am creating a forum and easy to read white papers for  If you have any recommendations or topics let us know.
  • Microsoft is transforming SPLA to CSP.  Surprise!   Many resources are moving away from SPLA to focus on Azure. will not be 100% Microsoft focused but cloud focused.  (including Google, AWS, and other publishers).
  • I  am launching a charity called “Mow Down Cancer” to help families with their lawn care and other household needs while their child is going through cancer treatments.
  • Last, my family bought a cat in 2017.  I think I would rather read the SPUR than deal with a cat (although she has grown on me).  The things we do for our kids.  Maybe I should go by “Cat Man”.

Thanks for reading and here’s to a prosperous 2018!




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Posted by on January 2, 2018 in Uncategorized

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