RSS

Category Archives: Cloud Solution Provider Program

Azure Partner Shared Services

Microsoft recently announced a new Azure Partner Shared Services offer in CSP that will allow resellers and other MSP’s the ability to create a unique tenant within Partner Center to purchase and deploy Azure subscriptions for internal use.

Prior to this announcement, CSP’s would have multiple invoices from Microsoft – (1) for internal workloads and others for their customers.   This announcement is intended for existing CSP resellers and MSP’s.  It is not necessarily intended for ISV partners to join CSP to build their applications.  Microsoft recommends ISV’s purchase Azure through a reseller or even azure.com.   For existing CSP’s and MSP’s, this announcement does three things:

  1. Allows you to purchase and use Azure in Partner Center (same place you resell and manage your customer’s Azure environment)
  2. Allows MSP’s to  build test environments and deploy internal workloads
  3. Extend your environment to include multi-tenant solutions.

Some common FAQ’s for Azure Partner Shared Services

Are ther specific licensing restrictions for this type of solution?

It’s actually licensed by the CSP partner.  When you (the CSP partner) purchase the solution, you are the licensee and is governed by the end customer license terms since it is internal use as oppose to the Reseller terms which is for your end customers.

Is this available in Office 365?

No.  It is not available for other cloud services at this time.

Is this available through any other licensing program?

No. It is designed for CSP providers only.

How do i create the shared services tenant?

For complete details, I recommend going here to learn more.

Is this part of SPLA?

No. It’s part of the CSP Program.

Thanks for reading,

SPLA Man

Advertisements
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Top 5 CSP Questions…Answered

Here are a few hot topics this week around CSP.  Enjoy!

What would happen if I sell myself Office Pro Plus through my own CSP authorization?  Can I do that?

No.  You cannot sell yourself Office 365 Pro Plus licenses.  You can purchase it through any volume licensing program or through another CSP provider.  Might be a good way to check out the competition support processes though!

If you are CSP authorized in Australia, but have customers in UK, can you resell Office 365 through CSP?

No. You can only resell in the region in which you are authorized. 

If my end customer purchased Office 365 Pro Plus through Volume Licensing, can I host it from my datacenter if I am QMTH authorized?

Yes. The end customer can purchase from any licensing program as long as it is Office 365 Pro Plus version.  As the service provider, you must be QMTH authorized.

 

If I purchase CSP licenses indirectly from my distributor, do I qualify for QMTH?

No.  You must CSP Direct authorized in order to that.  You cannot purchase from a distributor and offer VDI or Office Pro Plus.

If I sell Azure through CSP, how do I know which region my data is located?

With Azure, you get to pick the region.

If I sell Office 365 through CSP, which region is my service hosted from?

The address on the invoice determines the location of the services. 

***Watch out for the new Microsoft Cloud Agreement (MCA) coming in September.  You can download the old version here

Thanks for reading,

SPLA Man

 
1 Comment

Posted by on August 24, 2017 in Cloud Solution Provider Program

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

How the Microsoft CSP Program Indirect Program Works…Directly

The CSP Indirect program is a quick and relatively painless way to get started with Office 365 and other cloud solutions.  In this article, we will review how it works, how it doesn’t work, and things to consider before signing up.

The point of this blog is to make things simple; let’s stay with that concept for a moment.  In the simplest terms, CSP Indirect means you are “indirectly” selling solutions to your end customers.  Why indirect?  In this model, you do not hold (perhaps you do but don’t want to mess with it) the qualifications/authorizations to sell Microsoft cloud solutions directly to your end customers from Microsoft, you must purchase through a distributor and then sell to your customers.  This could mean higher pricing, working with third-party systems instead of your own, and procurement.  One of the biggest disadvantage (sometimes an advantage) is there’s no direct support line to Microsoft.  If something goes wrong, you contact your distributor, who works directly with Microsoft.

As a cloud provider, you are also limited in some of the solutions you can sell to your customer from your datacenter environment.  Take as an example, the Qualified Multitenant Hosting Addendum (QMH).   If you are currently purchasing licenses through an indirect partner, you cannot host Windows 10 E3/E5 from your shared cloud environment. Only authorized CSP Direct partners have that luxury.  The same is true for Office Pro Plus and other desktop applications.

The advantage of CSP Indirect is you do not have to spend resources (including investing in additional staff and funding a platform) That’s all on the distributor.  You can think of CSP Indirect as white labeling Office 365.  It’s not technically white labeled (your end customer knows they are getting Office 365) but the billing comes from you.  CSP Indirect means you are leveraging someone else’s resources to deliver a solution to your end customers.  You still bill your customer and can provide basic support, which has its benefits.

Is CSP Indirect right for your business?  If you are just getting started in selling Office 365 or are currently purchasing Office 365 licenses on behalf of your customers from the Microsoft portal, CSP Indirect is the way to go.  If you are a large provider who has the resources, personnel, and funds to support CSP Direct solution, I would recommend going CSP Direct over Indirect.

In either program, you do not get off without knowing the licensing.  That’s for another article.

Thanks for reading,

SPLA Man

 

 

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: